Shipment Options

How it Works

Ship methods are the way in which information is communicated through partners of how an order will be shipped. Every partner has their own way of expressing a specific carrier and service level through a variation of codes and descriptions. Logicbroker’s ship method mappings function allows suppliers and retailers to map their unique custom codes to our standard codes.

 

Creating this mapping will ensure the correct codes (both carrier and service level) will be sent to your partner in full compliance.

 Tip:

Suppliers can avoid mapping custom codes and have all codes for shipments defaulted to what is received on the order. This is a Logicbroker Direct feature, to learn more about this offering, see Logicbroker Direct (scroll down to Features and Their Use Cases > Portal Configurations > Copy Ship Method from Order to Shipment)

 

Ship Method Terminology

To learn more about Logicbroker's ship method terminology, click on the term you'd like to know more about.

SCAC
Stands for Standard Carrier Alpha Code
 
Ship Method
The method of delivering a product to a customer. This is defined by carrier and service level. This may often show as the standard code in the portal.
 
Service Level
Expresses the duration of transportation.
Carrier
Is the party that transports the goods. While the carrier may be FedEx, the Carrier Code may be FDEG
Standard Code
Is the service level and carrier consolidated into one code. Ex: FDEG-CG (where the carrier is FedEx: FDEG and the service level is Ground, CG).
Custom Code
The code a partner uses to define a specific carrier and service level. This is how the ship method is set up in a partner’s external system.
Receiver Class Code
The code the receiver of the document lists as the ship method. For orders, the receiver is the supplier. For shipments, the receiver is the retailer.
Sender Class Code
The code the sender of the document lists as the ship method. For orders, the sender is the retailer. For shipments, the sender is the supplier.
Description
The written-out ship method with no codes. Ex: FedEx Ground

Example

Take the ship method FedEx Ground. The carrier is FedEx and the service level is Ground.
Each partner defines FedEx Ground with their unique custom code:

  • Retailer: FDEG-GR
  • Supplier: fedex_ground

Logicbroker defines this ship method with the Standard Code: FDEG-CG (for a full list of our Standard Codes, in the portal navigate to Settings > Shipment Options > review the first column).

*If a supplier or retailer uses a code that is different to our Standard Code to refer to the same ship method, their codes are known as Custom Codes.

Depending on the document that is being traded (order or shipment), the code is also known as the sender class code or the receiver class code.

In order for a retailer to send their custom code and the receiver to understand what that code means in their system and send back the respective code, both the retailer and the supplier need to have their unique custom codes mapped within Logicbroker.

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Order Flow 

The following diagram shows the order flow in relation to ship method mappings from the Retailer’s point of view.

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  1. Retailers will send in Orders with a ship method using their Custom Code
  2. Logicbroker translates the Custom Code to a Standard Code
  3. Logicbroker sets the Standard Code on the Order
  4. Before the Order leaves the system, Logicbroker translates the Logicbroker Standard Code to the supplier’s Custom Code

Shipment Flow 

The following diagram shows the shipment flow in relation to ship method mappings from the Supplier’s point of view.

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  1. Suppliers will send in Shipments with a ship method using the Custom Code they configured
  2. Logicbroker translates the Custom Code to a Standard Code
  3. Logicbroker sets the Standard Code on the Shipment
  4. Before the Shipment leaves the system, Logicbroker translates the Logicbroker Standard Code to the retailer’s Custom Code

 

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